Suggestions on a straightforward translation of Tao

A Cup Of Tea

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I have never read any Buddhist scripture, only read about Buddhism. I have also noted that there similarities to some extent between the two. Thank you for pointing out specific text for me to study.

This thread has given me plenty to do, it's almost daunting, but exciting.
 

A Cup Of Tea

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Well you don't need to buy it; the Dhammapada is here for free:

The Dhammapada: The Buddha's Path of Wisdom

Very good, thanks. Do you read most of your texts online? When do you decide to buy a book? I don't really have room for a lot of books in my apartment, but I find them charming and the form and function of books are elegant in a way. So when I know I like a book I don't think I can resist buying it.

I have read some Chinese scholars from the period when Buddhism was first introduced to China say that they are the same thing.
I have heard the same, and I can understand way. But I also see a distinct difference between the too. I'm not well read on either of them, so it's only an opinion, but I think Buddhism focus more on suffering. I also find that Buddhism feels more like a religion while the philosophical side of Tao speaks more to me.

:eek: seattlegal is not available as a download! :p
Are you sure? I think I say one on a downloading site...but I think it was called seattlegalu...
 

seattlegal

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Very good, thanks. Do you read most of your texts online? When do you decide to buy a book? I don't really have room for a lot of books in my apartment, but I find them charming and the form and function of books are elegant in a way. So when I know I like a book I don't think I can resist buying it.


I have heard the same, and I can understand way. But I also see a distinct difference between the too. I'm not well read on either of them, so it's only an opinion, but I think Buddhism focus more on suffering. I also find that Buddhism feels more like a religion while the philosophical side of Tao speaks more to me.
Indeed, Buddhism focuses more on dukkha than taoism does.

Three vinegar tasters: Confucius, Buddha, and Lao Tzu:

284d1159337566-how-connected-is-tao-with-3vinegartasters.jpg


Are you sure? I think I say one on a downloading site...but I think it was called seattlegalu...

There are many seattlegals on the web. Must be a different one.
 

Snoopy

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Very good, thanks. Do you read most of your texts online? When do you decide to buy a book? I don't really have room for a lot of books in my apartment, but I find them charming and the form and function of books are elegant in a way. So when I know I like a book I don't think I can resist buying it...

I use that site (Access To Insight) because it is authoritative - it contains translations of the Pali Canon. Otherwise I buy books. I love them too! Always have; also I did a print making course years ago so I really can appreciate the craft that goes into a hardback. As to when... I don't have much room either. But I recycle to a good second hand bookshop. I read reviews on Amazon and like to shop at (advert coming up!) wisdom-books.com. It's based in the UK.
I feel I've got to the point where I'm a bit booked-out on Buddhism but it took a long time! Deciding takes a kind of natural course, depending on where your path takes you...
 

Snoopy

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I have heard the same, and I can understand way. But I also see a distinct difference between the too. I'm not well read on either of them, so it's only an opinion, but I think Buddhism focus more on suffering. I also find that Buddhism feels more like a religion while the philosophical side of Tao speaks more to me..

There is religious Taoism and philosophical Taoism I think. Mind you, depending on your definition Buddhism is a religion or not or a philosophy or not....

As suggested by sg's vinegar-tasters, the three interacted within China. Buddhism plus philosophical Taoism equals Ch'an Buddhism perhaps. Rather like in India (and rather unlike in some other places...) schools of thought seemed in China to interact in a broadly positive way (intellectually-speaking).
 

A Cup Of Tea

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Indeed, Buddhism focuses more on dukkha than taoism does.

Three vinegar tasters: Confucius, Buddha, and Lao Tzu:

There is religious Taoism and philosophical Taoism I think. Mind you, depending on your definition Buddhism is a religion or not or a philosophy or not....

As suggested by sg's vinegar-tasters, the three interacted within China. Buddhism plus philosophical Taoism equals Ch'an Buddhism perhaps. Rather like in India (and rather unlike in some other places...) schools of thought seemed in China to interact in a broadly positive way (intellectually-speaking).
Yes I love that picture, and the though behind it. Having different thoughts effect different parts of one's life. Instead of a religion or philosophy that covers all aspects these three focuses on different things and have no need to comment on things that lay outside their own aspect.
I am also very fond of Bushido is directly or indirectly influenced by all these three as well as Shinto. Say what you will about a ruling class of samurai, but the idea behind it is quit beautiful. I would like to recommend the book Bushido the Soul of Japan by Inazo Nitobe. The author is English-speaking, Christian and uses many, many, western sources to convey the principles of Bushido to western audience.
You can find it here if nowhere else
Bushido, the Soul of Japan by Inazo Nitobe - Project Gutenberg

There are many seattlegals on the web. Must be a different one.
I was aiming for a joke on cheap Chinese knock-offs. You know there is none like you.
 

luecy7

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I was aiming for a joke on cheap Chinese knock-offs. You know there is none like you.
Well at least you didn't get accused of sounding like a female! :D:rolleyes::confused:

It takes two to Tao. Anything less is mental masturbation. :)
 

A Cup Of Tea

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It takes two to Tao. Anything less is mental masturbation. :)

Do you mean that the principles of Tao should be practised in my interactions with other people? From the other threads we are discussing, it seems as thou interaction with others are a key concept in you...philosophy?
 

radarmark

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I agree, luecy7 probably meant it that way. Taoism is, though, an inherently very personal and solitary thing. I suggest read, reflect, practice (whatever this means to you), then come back and discuss (if you care to).

Pax et amore omnia vincunt!
 

seattlegal

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I agree, luecy7 probably meant it that way. Taoism is, though, an inherently very personal and solitary thing. I suggest read, reflect, practice (whatever this means to you), then come back and discuss (if you care to).

Pax et amore omnia vincunt!
Indeed, Taoism is known for its hermits.
 

A Cup Of Tea

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I think I read somewhere, long ago, that the perfect Taoist (if there ever was such a thing) would be a complete hermit, but that it is not the goal of Taoism.
 

radarmark

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Yep, but there is also a long tradition within the path of working in the world. The hermit thing came about for a number of reasons: focus is on at-one-ment, Laozi was the (mythical) founder and left to be a hermit, the teachings are best read (not heard or preached), the esoteric ("witch" or "herbologist") branch was to China what mid-wives and homeopatics were in the European middle ages (persecuted), and the dominate philosophy in China (Kong Fuzism) really was at odds with it.

The goal? To live here and now? At-one-ment? Moderation, empathy and humbleness? Take your pick.
 

Nick the Pilot

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Tao (道) means a road or path, so it means traveling to a place, or having a goal. It seems that the goal to travel to the end of this road would be more than being "in the groove" or being in the here and now.

As a side note, 道 is written in Chinese Pinyin (the system of writing Chinese words in abc's) as Dao not Tao. The actual sound is said to be somewhere between the European T and D, which is the cause of this 'confusion.'
 
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