Suggestions on a straightforward translation of Tao

Nick the Pilot

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I see the goal of Taoism to be identical to Buddhism -- enlightenment and nirvana. Along the same train of thought, I see the two ideas of being "in the groove" or being in the here and now as techiniques to accelerate our progress along the path, not the goal itself.
 

Nick the Pilot

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Enjoy the ride. But this begs the questions -- are you willing to do things to accelerate your progress along the path? Is there any reason to accelerate such progress?
 

luecy7

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Do you mean that the principles of Tao should be practised in my interactions with other people? From the other threads we are discussing, it seems as thou interaction with others are a key concept in you...philosophy?
Just drawing a line between virtue, principle, life, truth, path, or way, and the solo mental masturbation that many people would prefer, regardless of the religious variant that they claim. Do you think I drew the line in error?
 

A Cup Of Tea

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The place I really have to get to is a place I must already be at now.

- Wittgenstein.

I'll have to sit a bit with that one.

Just drawing a line between virtue, principle, life, truth, path, or way, and the solo mental masturbation that many people would prefer, regardless of the religious variant that they claim. Do you think I drew the line in error?
I don't have an opinion, I don't know the Tao yet, I just wanted to understand you clearly.
I do enjoy mental masturbation though, it reveals complexities of life. It's not the same as living the path, perhaps, but I think we can do both, or just either, whatever brings meaning to our lives.
 

A Cup Of Tea

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ACOT - have you ever read Robert Louis Stevenson's "El Dorado"? It's my favorite literature on focusing on the journey, not the destination...

I was planing to buy a nice lather bound collection of seven novels by Robert Louis Stevenson, but I just checked and El Dorado was not one of them, I'll just have to go to the library, thanks for the suggestion.
 

Etu Malku

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Do Nothing and Everything is Done!
I understand both Taoism and Buddhism are concerned with atoning with the Natural Universe, both are Right Hand Paths. Extinguishing the Ego and becoming Selfless.

Would that be correct?
 

seattlegal

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Do Nothing and Everything is Done!
I understand both Taoism and Buddhism are concerned with atoning with the Natural Universe, both are Right Hand Paths. Extinguishing the Ego and becoming Selfless.

Would that be correct?
Taoism has plenty of alchemical (what you would call left hand path) literature, like Secret of the Golden Flower, as well. It's more like being in tune with where ever you are or go.
 

Etu Malku

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Taoism has plenty of alchemical (what you would call left hand path) literature, like Secret of the Golden Flower, as well. It's more like being in tune with where ever you are or go.
I am quite fond of the Secret of the Golden Flower.

Jung became immersed in the study of medieval alchemy in order to provide a model for his own psychological theories, publishing ‘Psychology and Alchemy’ in 1944. His work is credited with directly leading to a revival of interest in this area of occult knowledge. He often emphasized the importance of the alchemist’s quest for the “philosopher’s stone”, which could transmute base metals into gold; a metaphor for the spiritual transformation of the self.

In alchemy, the philosopher’s stone resulted from the androgynous union of divine opposites (dark and light), and for Jung, like a cocoon and butterfly, was a symbol for the metamorphosis of higher self. Psychiatric analysis was a form of alchemy, he claimed, and each of the alchemist’s ingredients had a psychological equivalent. In this regard, iron was courageous and passionate, while tin was truthful and lofty. The element of Mercury, seen as the toxic, deceptive, transformative element which made the union of opposites possible, was by Jung’s definition, representative of the collective unconscious.
 

seattlegal

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I am quite fond of the Secret of the Golden Flower.

Jung became immersed in the study of medieval alchemy in order to provide a model for his own psychological theories, publishing ‘Psychology and Alchemy’ in 1944. His work is credited with directly leading to a revival of interest in this area of occult knowledge. He often emphasized the importance of the alchemist’s quest for the “philosopher’s stone”, which could transmute base metals into gold; a metaphor for the spiritual transformation of the self.

In alchemy, the philosopher’s stone resulted from the androgynous union of divine opposites (dark and light), and for Jung, like a cocoon and butterfly, was a symbol for the metamorphosis of higher self. Psychiatric analysis was a form of alchemy, he claimed, and each of the alchemist’s ingredients had a psychological equivalent. In this regard, iron was courageous and passionate, while tin was truthful and lofty. The element of Mercury, seen as the toxic, deceptive, transformative element which made the union of opposites possible, was by Jung’s definition, representative of the collective unconscious.

The Philosopher's Stone--I have a much different interpretation of that. {But that's a whole other debate!} :p
 

DrumR

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I can't resist strawberries with balsamic vinegar. :)
Thank you for the favor of a reply Seattlegal.

You may rest assured that I shall not reduce your portion of same. In fact you may have any strawberries that are inadvertently placed upon my plate near the hot tub.

I Thank you also for posting the "Three Vinegar Tasters." It is a personal "always favorite."
 

DrumR

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I wish to read up on the tao but I find it rather daunting. There are so many books and ways to describe the tao that I keep prosponing finding a suitable book.
Poetry and elaborate symbolism don't do much for me. I found Lionel Giles translation of the Art of War spoke to me so perhaps something in that fashion.
I wish Vajradhara was more active nowadays, he/she/it seems very knowledgeable in this area.

Greetings, A Cup of Tea.

To my mind you have two of three titles that I believe will help to understand portions of the Tao. I would suggest a third, the I Ching. These three, when taken together, help to paint a more complete picture of of an otherwise incomplete puzzle. Without the further expedient of putting the lessons to the experiential test, much of the Tao will remain elusive.

As from my previous message, Harmony is more to be sought for, from the Taoist perspective, than is balance. An examination of previous post threads, contained within the Tao section of these forums, may also prove of some use, further confusion, or both.;)
 
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