A comfort with death

Discussion in 'Philosophy' started by wil, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Sounds sort of morose and it isn't 100% true, but I have a comfort with death.

    I don't know when it happened, but it was evident decades ago when my father died. It may have started long before that when my paternal grandmother died, or thinking about it before that when as a teen my maternal grandfather died.

    I saw it in my daughter when my maternal grandmother died at 99 she said "ah dang, (as she swung her balled fist downward) she didn't make it to 100!". The recognition of passing, some disappointment, but not sorrow. That is 'often' how I feel, a recognition of a life lived..and having said that, where I find issues is when I feel a life was not lived. Those taken to young, those getting things done and cut down in their prime.

    As a kid seeing my grandfather in a casket I saw a shell, not the man I new, it didn't even look like him to me. And every open casket I've walked up to, I've recognized the body, but not the person I knew....obviously the life was gone and that is what I knew was the life.

    When someone you treasure becomes a memory, your memories become a treasure.

    That has been my mantra a long time. When they pass my memories become alive, joyous and the thing I cling. I have no hope for a hereafter, I do have a clinging on some form of reincarnation, that spirit moving into onto another life however that may occur or manifest.

    This contemplation like me is a work in progress. But I see death as inevitable part of life. I have a connection of sorts with Shiva, with the tasty fungus in a fallen log, with change as it naturally inevitably occurs.

    The contemplation has been accentuated and complicated with my brush with death, with my not only being brought back from the brink, but my life intentionally temporarily extinguished and revived. I've misplaced a couple weeks there, and then recovered amazed. If I had gone, that would have been that...and I would have had a hell of a life...now I contemplate how to add to it.

    (This is not the thread I started but it is the thread I have)
     
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  2. Namaste Jesus

    Namaste Jesus Praise the Lord and Enjoy the Chai

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    I do sometimes lament over lost youth and the ravages of time on the flesh, but as for my own physical demise, I made piece with that long ago. It's when others pass that I'm sometimes taken aback. Those I held in the highest regard. Those that in my eyes, were bigger than life.

    It's times like these I feel a deep void and long for what once was. Ah, but this too doth pass and life goes on with many a fond memory to draw upon...
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2019
  3. StevePame

    StevePame Administrator Staff Member

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    I still struggle with it. I'm fortunate in that I didn't lose many people close to me until I was older, but that left me more aware of their absence. I've wondered if losing a love one early is easier, because you have longer to process it, or because in your most formative years you build walls to contain the grief.
     
  4. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet Deus Pascus Corvus

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    It is a good that the life you have lived has bought you this quietude in your later years. It is peace, brother
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  5. Cino

    Cino Big Love

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    Good for you, Wil!

    I did not have healthy relationships with either of my parents. One died when I was a young adult, and their death was a relief. When the other parent died we were able to part in peace, with lots of unfinished business nonetheless.

    A life-threatening illness of a loved one left me devastated, although they recovered. I would not have been ready, and am still not ready, should they die before it's my time.

    As for me, I used to almost long for the release of death. Happy to report that I've been back from that place for many years now. Not ready to go yet. But not afraid either.
     
  6. Arif Ghamiq

    Arif Ghamiq Active Member

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    A Hadith of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)

    “The gift to a Believer is Death.”

    (At-Tirmidhi)
     
  7. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    That makes incredible sense for an abrahamic believer that has followed the tenets of their belief system.
     
  8. Arif Ghamiq

    Arif Ghamiq Active Member

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    Could it not apply to a Hindu, Buddhist or others ?
     
  9. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Sure, I just don't know their hereafter beliefs
     
  10. Cino

    Cino Big Love

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    I gues in Buddhism they would call that kind of death Parinirvana, the death of an awakened being.
     
  11. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    That should be inscribed somewhere ...
     
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  12. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    It is my go-to saying whenever I encounter people who have experienced a loss. I can't recall where I first read it, but is it is the words I use when there are no words.
     
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