Jewish Calendar

Bandit

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I want to know what the difference is in years, from the gregorian calendar & the jewish calendar.

for example if we are in 5766 vs. 2005 AD.

if we did not use BC/AD we would be in approx. year 6005. see?
how many years difference is there, considering the days per year are not the same in the 360 day calendar. so it appears to about 239 years dfference? (but i know that is not correct because of the cycles)

i was also reading where the 360 day calendar is perfect & exact.
so, my first request is, i am looking for the difference in years that would accumulate, say over a 6000 year time span AND kind of asking for someone to do the math for me & give me a figure.

does that make sense?

i also do not understand how there can be 354, 384, & 390 VS. the 365/366 days in a year, except to catch up with leap years or months. that is confusing for me.
i dont understand the cycles in the Jewish Calendar. i have read on it, but it still does not make sense to me. so i have lots of questions, if you do not mind.

i am asking because i have some other calculations that i want to understand & i think the figure I am looking for in my first question may help me.
 
Bandit, the days are not the same, but the Jewish calendar has leap years with a whole extra month so it evens out. No difference in years would accumulate. It would remain the same. The Jewish new year is always around the same time of year, but it gets adjusted once in a while by a leap year so that it doesn't end up at some other time of year. I'm not sure if I've answered your question. Or if there were others. Hopefully this clarifies some things.

Dauer
 
I took my daughter and four friends to go wine-tasting today .... I was the designated driver, so I sat around and read and warmed my spirit by the sun and the beautiful vineyards .... while they had fun wine-tasting .... anyway, I happen to read this a few hours ago and then when I got home saw this new thread on the Jewish Calendar .... it may be helpful .... poh


"The Venus cycle, and preparation for new kingship required an interregnum of forty days to carefully select a new king .... this makes perfect sense if the people concerned were using the year of 366 days that we have already described as being the basis of calculations used at megalithic sites in the British Isles. The technique of predicting the next Venus arrival in its forty cycle was to count forty years of 366 days and then subtract forty days. This is far more logical than it first sounds, because it is actually the precise difference between two kinds of year: first, the solar year of 365 days; second, the stellar year of 366 days, which is the actual number of revolutions of the planet Earth in a year. The difference arises because the Earth's orbit around the Sun causes sunrise each day to be late by 236 seconds, which adds up to exactly one day over a year. Tracking Venus through one cycle involved forty solar years followed by a 'fallow' forty days to wait for the stellar year. There is one pass in the Old Testament that tells us that this was the method of calculation used. In Numbers 14: 33-34 it says:

and your children shall wander in the wilderness forty years.... after the number of days in which ye searched the land, even forty days, each day for a year, shall ye bear your iniquities, even forty years, and ye shall know my breach of promise. "
 
pohaikawahine said:
I took my daughter and four friends to go wine-tasting today .... I was the designated driver, so I sat around and read and warmed my spirit by the sun and the beautiful vineyards .... while they had fun wine-tasting .... anyway, I happen to read this a few hours ago and then when I got home saw this new thread on the Jewish Calendar .... it may be helpful .... poh


"The Venus cycle, and preparation for new kingship required an interregnum of forty days to carefully select a new king .... this makes perfect sense if the people concerned were using the year of 366 days that we have already described as being the basis of calculations used at megalithic sites in the British Isles. The technique of predicting the next Venus arrival in its forty cycle was to count forty years of 366 days and then subtract forty days. This is far more logical than it first sounds, because it is actually the precise difference between two kinds of year: first, the solar year of 365 days; second, the stellar year of 366 days, which is the actual number of revolutions of the planet Earth in a year. The difference arises because the Earth's orbit around the Sun causes sunrise each day to be late by 236 seconds, which adds up to exactly one day over a year. Tracking Venus through one cycle involved forty solar years followed by a 'fallow' forty days to wait for the stellar year. There is one pass in the Old Testament that tells us that this was the method of calculation used. In Numbers 14: 33-34 it says:

and your children shall wander in the wilderness forty years.... after the number of days in which ye searched the land, even forty days, each day for a year, shall ye bear your iniquities, even forty years, and ye shall know my breach of promise. "

this calendar is easy for me to understand because the leap year only comes every four years, but there is something special going on in the other calendar with the (40s) like we talked before in the Parsha about Moses. i think they were counting the days & weeks differently than we do today, though it comes out being the same as a year.
 
dauer said:
Bandit, the days are not the same, but the Jewish calendar has leap years with a whole extra month so it evens out. No difference in years would accumulate. It would remain the same. The Jewish new year is always around the same time of year, but it gets adjusted once in a while by a leap year so that it doesn't end up at some other time of year. I'm not sure if I've answered your question. Or if there were others. Hopefully this clarifies some things.

Dauer

ok. i see that no difference in years would accumulate, but where/why is that gap of years between the 5766 & 6005 (2005AD) that appears to be 239 years?

what part of history or the calendar (or change in calendar) am I missing?
we did this huge study in sunday school years ago but i was too young to follow it then.
 
I'm not sure I understand. The Jewish calendar is calculated from what was believed to be the creation of the world, based on math done based on the Torah's chronology. It was one of a number of such attempts, but it's the one that became most popular. It is not the years that were used in the Tanach. It came about I think around the time of the mishna but maybe later. Don't remember. In the Tanach, usually it will say something like, 'in the 6th year of the reign of king fuzziewuzzie bear.'

Oh, I see what you mean now. There's no gap. The starting calculations for each of the calendars are just unrelated. One has to do with the birth of Jesus according to Christian calculations and one has to do with the creation of the world according to Jewish calculations. Okay, you guys were a little closer with yours than we were with ours. :D

Dauer
 
Bandit said:
this calendar is easy for me to understand because the leap year only comes every four years, but there is something special going on in the other calendar with the (40s) like we talked before in the Parsha about Moses. i think they were counting the days & weeks differently than we do today, though it comes out being the same as a year.

bandit .... yes, I was thinking the same thing and perhaps when we get back to the Parsha this will come up again and we should explore it. I also have some interesting intervals between certain events in the Torah that we may want to speak to in the Parsha. Some years ago I did a timeline of events on the earth using about 4 or 5 different calendars for the same timelines .... it took me many pages because it was so long and I rolled it up like a scroll .... will have to find it and see how some of the events match up with the different calendars.... this is when I wish we could all be sitting down at the same table face-to-face discussing and exploring our connections .... aloha nui, poh
 
was easier without techonology now we have nano second leaps periodically to cooridinate with our nuclear clocks...

There was a woman once in a class complaining that we had to conform to this man made mistaken 2005 calender..

To which the teacher replied, 'Which man made mistaken calendar would you like to use?'

Everything is arbitrary...and most current knowledge is based on current knowledge which at some point in time will be ancient knowledge and with the youngsters of the day will say....can you believe they believed that??
 
pohaikawahine said:
bandit .... yes, I was thinking the same thing and perhaps when we get back to the Parsha this will come up again and we should explore it. I also have some interesting intervals between certain events in the Torah that we may want to speak to in the Parsha. Some years ago I did a timeline of events on the earth using about 4 or 5 different calendars for the same timelines .... it took me many pages because it was so long and I rolled it up like a scroll .... will have to find it and see how some of the events match up with the different calendars.... this is when I wish we could all be sitting down at the same table face-to-face discussing and exploring our connections .... aloha nui, poh

yah. that is when i like being face to face at a huge table also. i would really enjoy seeing your scroll someday. i also like it when the timelines are painted on large muros because you can see the work & effort put forth.:)
 
dauer said:
I'm not sure I understand. The Jewish calendar is calculated from what was believed to be the creation of the world, based on math done based on the Torah's chronology. It was one of a number of such attempts, but it's the one that became most popular. It is not the years that were used in the Tanach. It came about I think around the time of the mishna but maybe later. Don't remember. In the Tanach, usually it will say something like, 'in the 6th year of the reign of king fuzziewuzzie bear.'

Oh, I see what you mean now. There's no gap. The starting calculations for each of the calendars are just unrelated. One has to do with the birth of Jesus according to Christian calculations and one has to do with the creation of the world according to Jewish calculations. Okay, you guys were a little closer with yours than we were with ours. :D

Dauer

i am seeing where the jewish calendar may be more accurate & the 365 day calendar could have been stretched somewhere to go back to the 4000 BC (not sure). I know not the beginning of the world (heaven/earth), but maybe the beginning of the world as in (modern man) like as in Adam.
the difference is not that far apart between the two.

yes, now you know what i am saying.

so in the 6th year of king fuzziewuzzie bear,. on the second month & the 29th day...that would be hard to figure out but i think they did figure a lot of it out.

the Jewish calendar has leap years with a whole extra month so it evens out.

can you direct me to a particular passage where the extra month is mentioned in the OT, or is it not mentioned? that would be cool to see.:)
 
The extra month was a creation of the rabbis. Back in the day, new year was determined by the barley harvest, so there was no need for a leap year. Karaites still determine based on the barley harvest.


Dauer
 
Why do they begin their new year in Sept, when the scriptures say the new year begins with the month of Abib which is around "March" Or "April?"
 
There is more than one new year on the Jewish calendar according to the Talmud. Found it: Rosh Hashana Mishna 1

"There are four new years. On the first of Nisan is the New Year for Kings and for festivals; on the first of Elul is the New Year for the tithe of animals... on the first of Tishri is the New Year for years, for sabbatical years, for jubilee years, for planting, and for vegetables. And on the first of Shevat is the New Year for trees, according to the view of the school of Shammai, but the school of Hillel say the fifteenth thereof."

Aviv is no longer called that. It is now called by Jews by the babylonian name "nisan." See Hebcal for a current calendar:

http://www.hebcal.com/

edit: and welcome to c-r, holly. Sorry, I thought you were bandit.
 
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