I am ashamed to be Australian

greymare

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,141
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Location
Maryland. usa. FINALLY! LOL
well, I didnt think it could happen but it has I am ashamed to be an Australian:mad: This week a 10yr old girl was raped by 9 (men and teens).:mad::mad::mad::mad: Worse still, the prosecutor recommended no custodial sentences to be given as she "probably consented":mad::mad::mad: Worse still, the Judge agreed:mad::mad:. People over here are up in arms about it. This all happened in the Cairns District Court. (I dunno how to link it) I dont care what the situation or who the child is. CHILD. THAT POOR LITTLE GIRL.:eek::mad::( . Im sorry but we need an officer of the law who has the balls to prosecute to the full extent of the law or to substitute the existing law for a harsher one. I cried when I read this story . The judge also needs to be investigated. :mad: What are your thoughts??????
 
That's horrible, grey. The act itself is horrific, and topped off with the fatherly powers-that-be proclaiming that the girl "probably consented," the ordeal becomes perverse. It is exceedingly infuriating how patriarchies continue to patronize women and children and any minority as if they, simply by virtue of their having a white penis, know more than the other person what is in that individual's best interest. I wonder how they came to their conclusions and verdict.

If you would like to paste the link (please do), simply highlight the web address at the top of the article's window, as in
http://www.comparative-religion.com/forum/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=131819
for this very page, and then we will all be able to click on that link and read the article.

--P.
 
Grey...I am so sorry for your distress and for that poor little girl. Pathless has the correct take on this I believe. When the males in any part of society tend to feel emasculated or dominated by the "weaker" members of society (women and children) they tend to eventually do horrible things to them in a random way.

This was a hallmark of the horrors of the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo, as well as the ongoing horrors in Darfur. That this disease has struck so close to you and yours is also horrifying. But maybe it's a signal for you and your neighbors who feel the same way to do something "real" to stop it in its tracks.

You've got a newly elected head of government I understand. Write him a letter and get several hundred who agree with you to co-sign it with you That might be a good start.

flow....;)
 

That's perfect, grey!

It says in the article that the girl is an Aborigine and was first raped, in a separate incident, when she was seven:

The child - who cannot be named - was gang-raped at the age of seven in Aurukun on Cape York in 2002, and was placed into foster care with a non-indigenous family in Cairns.​
However, child safety officers in April 2006 returned her to Aurukun, where she was raped again at the age of 10.​


Any indication of the ethnicity of her attackers is absent from the article. Usually when no qualifying information is given about people (i.e. "aboriginal men," or "black men," as opposed to "men"), the implication is that they are white. The fact that they were not sentenced also indicates that they are likely white. Had they been aboriginal men, for instance, I think this scenario may have played out differently:
1) It may not have even been investigated
2) It may have been investigated, the men prosecuted and sentenced to harsher than usual punishments.
Option 2 is what usually happens when black men are accused of crimes against white women here in the states.
 
That's perfect, grey!

It says in the article that the girl is an Aborigine and was first raped, in a separate incident, when she was seven:
The child - who cannot be named - was gang-raped at the age of seven in Aurukun on Cape York in 2002, and was placed into foster care with a non-indigenous family in Cairns.​
However, child safety officers in April 2006 returned her to Aurukun, where she was raped again at the age of 10.​
Any indication of the ethnicity of her attackers is absent from the article. Usually when no qualifying information is given about people (i.e. "aboriginal men," or "black men," as opposed to "men"), the implication is that they are white. The fact that they were not sentenced also indicates that they are likely white. Had they been aboriginal men, for instance, I think this scenario may have played out differently:
1) It may not have even been investigated
2) It may have been investigated, the men prosecuted and sentenced to harsher than usual punishments.
Option 2 is what usually happens when black men are accused of crimes against white women here in the states.

Hi Pathless,
Assume- from "makes an ass of u & me"

The men were aboriginal and the judge was a woman.
Child abuse has been rife in aboriginal communities for a long time now. The previous Prime Minister, Howard had been trying to do something about it by banning alcohol and pornography.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/06/15/1952118.htm

Child sex abuse rife in Indigenous communities: report
PM - Child abuse rife in Aboriginal communities: report

If the girl was white or the men were white, there would have been an appropriate punishment. But because of "cultural" reasons the judge was soft.

Kind Regards,
Br.Bruce
 
unfortunately what bro bruce says is true. I dont want to get into a racist debate here but here is a few home truths about Australia. For a long time the communities (aboriginal) were given basically their own ability to carry out laws and look after their own communities andcitizens. Yes it was funded by the federal government and thus by the rest of Oz, fair enough and so is the dole, pensions.etc. After a few government enquiries into corruption and the monies not actually going to the residents and their needs. the Federal government basically has taken it back over. Most of these communities are derelict to the extreme have little facilites (as they have been destroyed) and resemble third world countries. the youth and indeed the general population rely soley on government pensions/welfare and fill their days, drinking, sniffing glue and petrol and running amok. It is true. If you live their and want a better life you have to leave as is the culture of the community. Not intended but just the despair is so evident and their is no hope.
Now before you get on your soapbox about how badly ;these people are treated, think for a minute, everyone else in the country has the same rights and actually if I was in the same financial situation I would actuallly be entitled to LESS money and assistance because I am not aboriginal. think about it. Our government hasnt helped helpless people it has just thrown money at their elders and hoped that they will go away. that also is appalling.
 
Thanks for clearing things up, Bruce and grey.

greymare said:
Now before you get on your soapbox about how badly ;these people are treated, think for a minute, everyone else in the country has the same rights and actually if I was in the same financial situation I would actuallly be entitled to LESS money and assistance because I am not aboriginal. think about it. Our government hasnt helped helpless people it has just thrown money at their elders and hoped that they will go away. that also is appalling.

In America, alcoholism among Indians is also a large problem. That the rapists are Aborigines doesn't completely surprise me. When people are neglected and treated as less than human, as American Indians and Australian Aborigines have been, they are prone to losing self-respect and respect for others, prone to losing touch with their humanity. Their cultures have been effectively stamped out and their ways of life denigrated. I agree with you, grey. Money will not solve the problems of a colonized people who are now foreigners in their own land.
 
yes, thats right the money wont fix the bigger problem. No, i dont know what will. Far better educated people than me have tried and so far all have failed. A lot boils down to people fixing their own problems, i suppose. dont wait to be rescued, do it your self. Like a lot of things in this life.
 
well, I didnt think it could happen but it has I am ashamed to be an Australian:mad: This week a 10yr old girl was raped by 9 (men and teens).:mad::mad::mad::mad: Worse still, the prosecutor recommended no custodial sentences to be given as she "probably consented":mad::mad::mad: Worse still, the Judge agreed:mad::mad:. People over here are up in arms about it. This all happened in the Cairns District Court. (I dunno how to link it) I dont care what the situation or who the child is. CHILD. THAT POOR LITTLE GIRL.:eek::mad::( . Im sorry but we need an officer of the law who has the balls to prosecute to the full extent of the law or to substitute the existing law for a harsher one. I cried when I read this story . The judge also needs to be investigated. :mad: What are your thoughts??????

Give me a badge ;\ Judge Septimus... Shall be my name I AM TEH LAW!

I wouldn't be ashamed of what nationality you are as what happened, in no way represents you does it?
 
yes, thats right the money wont fix the bigger problem. No, i dont know what will. Far better educated people than me have tried and so far all have failed. A lot boils down to people fixing their own problems, i suppose. dont wait to be rescued, do it your self. Like a lot of things in this life.

Yes, yet indigenous populations are put in a strange predicament: they have been swept up into alien cultures and at the same time held away from those cultures. They've been uprooted from their traditions but remain who they are, and who they are is basically unnacceptable to western civilization. It is much easier for individuals of Anglo and European descent to help themselves, regardless of what money is available, than it is for someone whose culture has been nearly exterminated, then co-opted.

The disturbing thing about this particular case is that it is not only the nine Aboriginal men who are guilty, but the entire colonial system which has created the present situation. Extrememly complicated, yes, with no good solution that I can see.

As far as your comment 17th, I would say that unfortunately it represents many of us. It's easy enough to say "I would never do such a thing," and I don't think any of us here would; however, we are all caught up and living within a global system that exploits the Earth, animals, and other human beings. Whether we like it or not, we are a part of it.
 
White man's reparations at the demands of the abused are often throwing money at the situation, aka, welfare/dole/lump sum payments. We've effectively done the same to our indigenous peoples in the US the American Indian, the Eskimo, etc. And we've abused blacks by the same system, creating an entitlement society, it is a shame.
 
As far as your comment 17th, I would say that unfortunately it represents many of us. It's easy enough to say "I would never do such a thing," and I don't think any of us here would; however, we are all caught up and living within a global system that exploits the Earth, animals, and other human beings. Whether we like it or not, we are a part of it.


Hell no it does not, They were humans, they were males... They spoke English... I have all that in common but what they did has nothing to do with me, and does not represent me..... Just because they are Australlian, it doesn't represent Grey........ Every man, is accountable for his own actions... I have NO part of it... So don't put that bull on me.
 
I know 17th and I love you for it. I just feel disgusted thats all and I understand what you are saying. In my world we will have a group of people that right wrongs no matter whose authority condones it and you my knight shall be my champion. arise "SIR 17th ANGEL" OF DERRING DO. The peoples champion ...... Mr 1derful....
 
Huge big hug for Grey.

It is horrible when your 'community' does something offensive or stupid, I feel it within Islam (you know which bit), being British (the stupid political decisions) and back home in Egypt (the corruption and treatment of women) - boy my life is full of guilt.

As 17th says, you are not responsble for the actions of those men and yes you should petition the government and say you, as a citizen, do not accept this. It doesn't stop what happened but hopefully if enough people speak out it will not happen to another girl or if it does the men will be appropriately punished (hopefully strung up from a tree).

I feel for you. xxxxxx
 
Hell no it does not, They were humans, they were males... They spoke English... I have all that in common but what they did has nothing to do with me, and does not represent me..... Just because they are Australlian, it doesn't represent Grey........ Every man, is accountable for his own actions... I have NO part of it... So don't put that bull on me.

What I am saying is that it does represent all of us in as much as we are a part of a global colonial system which has degraded entire populations of people for hundreds of years. That colonial system has created the conditions in which Aboriginal Australians live, and is therefore, in large part, responsible for the social problems that have sprung up. Yes, the men who raped this girl are guilty. Yet it is not as black and white--pardon the pun--of a crime as it would be if it had happened in a cosmopolitan, Eurocentric area. What we have in this case are indigenous people who have committed an atrocious crime against another indigenous person. The social system that would have mediated, punished, or even prevented such abuses, has long since broken down and been colonized by western, Eurocentric values. Therefore, the crime falls under the jurisidiction of a Eurocentric court, instead of being resolved within the native community, as it once may have been. In addition to that, we all hear about it through TV and newspapers and make our cultural-laden value judgments, get outraged, and call for justice.

Yet when I think deeply about it, I have the idea that justice for these people ended a long time ago. The call for justice that we make, as civilized westerners, serves a lot of purposes. It allows us to further separate ourselves from "the savages" and say "I would never do that, they should be hanged."

Muslimwoman said:
the men will be appropriately punished (hopefully strung up from a tree).

Oddly, the terror of this act impacts us in such a way that we move our focus from empathizing with the victim of the crime, a ten-year old girl, to separating ourselves from and hating the men who raped her, and from there again to empathizing with and supporting each other for having such big hearts and courageous wills:

17th Angel said:
Every man, is accountable for his own actions... I have NO part of it... So don't put that bull on me.

greymare said:
I know 17th and I love you for it. I just feel disgusted thats all and I understand what you are saying. In my world we will have a group of people that right wrongs no matter whose authority condones it and you my knight shall be my champion. arise "SIR 17th ANGEL" OF DERRING DO. The peoples champion ...... Mr 1derful....

Muslimwoman said:
As 17th says, you are not responsble for the actions of those men and yes you should petition the government and say you, as a citizen, do not accept this. It doesn't stop what happened but hopefully if enough people speak out it will not happen to another girl or if it does the men will be appropriately punished (hopefully strung up from a tree).

I feel for you. xxxxxx

Maybe the solution doesn't lie only in punishing the perpatrators of crimes like this, since they are, in my analysis, also victims of colonialism. We've already established that throwing money at the problem doesn't work, and that some of the most "educated" people in Australia have failed to produce answers. What can we do? I don't know. I think a good place to start is trying to put events like this into a larger social and historical perspective, and to educate ourselves about how we are indeed embedded in colonial systems, no matter the color and content of our hearts.

Somehow I feel like the intimate details of how I live my individual life are what's important here, in as much as I can dissociate myself from the cultural forces that keep people, animals, plants, and minerals colonized. But since we are so entrenched in a colonial, exploitative system, complete dissociation is impossible, and I come back to feeling a little bit responsible for every atrocity in the world, which keeps me analyzing how I spend my money, what I eat, where I eat, where I work, and even the thoughts I think. It's the toughest job I know, but I love it. It's a refining process, and allows me to see that yes, I may be embedded and responsible, but at the same time I am a conscious being, able to analyze and make changes.

What change I can make in my life that will prevent colonized people from acts of sexual violence and community- and self-destruction is well beyond me at this point. I do know that pointing fingers at other victims, however, will not bring a resolution that I like. At this point, maybe awareness and empathy are the best I can do.

My observations, thoughts, and self-delusions.

--P
 
Child abuse has been rife in aboriginal communities for a long time now. The previous Prime Minister, Howard had been trying to do something about it by banning alcohol and pornography.

Child sex abuse rife in Indigenous communities: report - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Child sex abuse rife in Indigenous communities: report
PM - Child abuse rife in Aboriginal communities: report

If the girl was white or the men were white, there would have been an appropriate punishment. But because of "cultural" reasons the judge was soft.

Kind Regards,
Br.Bruce

Thanks for the links. They help put the situation in context.
 
Back
Top