Anger

Discussion in 'Buddhism' started by Vajradhara, May 28, 2008.

  1. seattlegal

    seattlegal Why do cows say mu?

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    You explained this yourself in your previous post:

    The stronger emotion of optimized or transformed anger can cut through the delusions caused by desire and pride so you can see things as they are, not as you desire them to be, so you can take the correct actions needed.
     
  2. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    Yes, I think when we get frustrated enough with our situation to do something about it, we will indeed make creative use of anger, as you describe, and get very good results.


    Perhaps we can see anger as part of a Hate/Aversion/Anger constellation:
    In order to attain freedom from craving, its nature has to be clearly seen into, at root, and with that is clearly seen the folly of performing unskillful actions. We then realize that we are all based on Delusion/Ignorance (Moha), Greed/Desire (Lobha), and Hate/Aversion/Anger (Dosa), in short on the Three Fires...(W)e first refrain from acting unskillfully and in due course the very temptation to act in this way ceases because the Fires become exhausted from lack of fuel.
    Desire is the cause of Dukkha. But we don't want to get rid of desire. Why? Because we need desire to keep going with our spiritual aspirations and devote ourselves to our spiritual friends.

    So lets keep desire, but let's make it work for us in accordance with the Spirit of Awakening. :)
     
  3. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    Maybe a third option: focus on self due to shame about having become angry or possibly due to guilt in connection with an action one would not have committed were it not for anger.

     
  4. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    The conscious decision to use anger constructively and proactively is arguably most powerful element in this scenario and involves both clarity and self-control. The mind is taming the emotions.

    There have been several places where I've noted that Buddhist texts often use the term emotion and thought as though they are interchangeable. As it turns out, this is a recognized controversy. In one article, the authors went into some detail as to why they ended up going with one or the other term when translating from the Pali scriptures.

    But not to get to far afield here. I don't see pride as just an emotion. I see it as a mistaken attitude. In Biblical terms, it is a form of idolatry and in that sense, could be considered wrong belief.

    In the Buddhist view, everything starts with mind. We generate various emotions with our thoughts. There are various emotion-thought parcels that usually co-occur, but the thoughts seem more imprtant than the emotions. Emotions go away when we overcome the thoughts. That's why I underscored the function of negative thinking and false hopes in a previous post.

    The dislocation of life is due a misdirection of desire because of faulty thinking. The relationshiop to the world changes -- and so do the negative emotions that arise from a dysfunctional relationship -- when you change the underlying cognitions, attitudes, and beliefs.

    I think the key is to change our orientation toward the world (referenced as "self-centered approach") - like the idea that the world is just a consumer paradise full of objects for us to possess or control and being angry with the world when it is not forthcoming with what we want.
     
  5. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    I thought this was an interesting real life example of how someone might use anger as a smokescreen to avoid self-confrontation:
    Some time ago I became acquainted with a Caucasian Buddhist who for several years had made a daily practice of meditating on love. He confided that he had chosen this meditation subject because he was prone to frequent outbreaks of anger and chronic resentment; a "hate problem" he termed it. But despite years of meditation, the hatred had not diminished; the meditation had failed. Why?

    As our acquaintance broadened the answer became apparent. My friend had several poorly-concealed intellectual and emotional deficiencies. He never once revealed that he acknowledged these; on the contrary, he displayed frequent attempts to bolster his self-image. Such attempts were invariably doomed to frustration, especially when his accomplishments and social poise were contrasted with those of others. By reacting with anger towards others he avoided the unpleasantry of looking at himself. In other words, his anger was a psychological defense through which he sought to maintain an illusion of self-esteem. Thus unconsciously he did not wish to relinquish his anger. To do so would be too painful, and to attack the anger by meditating on love was futile, for anger was only a symptom. The real problem lay much deeper.

    To cure such hatred requires three things. First one must become aware of the existence of one's inadequacies and their accompanying humiliations; in other words, what is unconscious must become conscious. Second one must totally confront such unpleasant feelings and acknowledge them in their entirety. And finally one must relinquish the egotistical desire for self-exaltation. This last requirement is best achieved by objectively analyzing the illusion of self and gaining full appreciation for the changing and compounded nature of the personality. In other words, one must acquire insight of both types discussed above under the goals of meditation.

    Buddhist Meditation and Depth Psychology
     
  6. Francis king

    Francis king New Member

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    exactly...
     
  7. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    "Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you're the one who gets burned."
    ~the Buddha
     
  8. 17th Angel

    17th Angel לבעוט את התחת ולקחת שמות

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    But if your aim is true and your accuracy is on.... Get the other dude in the eye... Gonna be worth it. Yew knew... Like how most people.. (yes I am sticking with the word MOST.) Most people if they are hurt or down on their luck or whatnot... To see another worse then them makes it feel, alllllll better.... So to some I think they are willing to take the risk of self inflicted damage.
     
  9. Netti-Netti

    Netti-Netti New Member

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    Or maybe they decide the self inflicted damage is actually worth it.
     
  10. Will be

    Will be New Member

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    Anger is one form of shempa that I use less seriously now a days. So much of it is wasted energy, or added bad karma.

    So, in this life, one of my major goals, for today, for right now is to drop the anger, and that first comes with choosing silence over words, over any words.

    Oh... mmm... I love the sound of silence.

    I just look outside, and three deer silently pass by.

    Silence opens all the doors of perception, that have remained closed, shut by anger.
     
  11. nativeastral

    nativeastral fluffy future

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    underlying anger is fear underlying fear is love
     
  12. Will be

    Will be New Member

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    My first anger this morning, or I should write "the" first angry thought this morning, after waking up was in being told to do something by my wife. I was going to do something my way, I meant "the" way, but let it go to disengage conflict. Plus, I hadn't had my coffee yet. She must be Jesus, I meant "Buddha", that's always possible, to follow after.
     
  13. nativeastral

    nativeastral fluffy future

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    shouldn't that be 'the' wife?;)
     
  14. Will be

    Will be New Member

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    I'll think about it. I meant, feel about it. Oops, a, well yeah. I just got angry, and let it go, or her go.

    I need that second cup of coffee!
     
  15. Will be

    Will be New Member

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    My tummy is yelling for food, all angry like.
     
  16. 17th Angel

    17th Angel לבעוט את התחת ולקחת שמות

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    Thats what I said :D

    I know there have been examples in my own life where I have been more than willing to inflict or cause self pain/loss/damage/blah de blah de blargh.... Knowing in the long run I will "win" :) Sure if most look back hard enough they have too.... Cause you're all the same you humans! *sneers*
     
  17. nativeastral

    nativeastral fluffy future

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    always knew you were an alien:eek:
     
  18. shawn

    shawn New Member

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    Without heat, how will one make the water boil?
    Anger is fire and so the same rules apply as for handling fire (why and how).
    Unconstructive or destructive anger is never good, but constructive anger can, at times, be a very good thing.

    Just don't go to sleep being angry.
    deal with whatever caused the event.
     
  19. citizenzen

    citizenzen Custom User Title

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    And guns can, at times, be very good things too.

    It just turns out that the vast majority of time they're wielded destructively.

    I'd say, it's only the wisest of people who can channel anger effectively. In the hands of the rest of us it's a dangerous drug.
     
  20. Zenda71

    Zenda71 New Member

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    I'm reminded of the famous quote: Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.

    Here's the thing, however: How many of us never get angry? I often think that the real practice is not preventing anger from arising (although if someone knows the trick to that, please let me know!) but rather not indulging it. I take that view that anger is like everything else. You get angry and you let it go. You get happy, and you let it go. It makes no difference what it is; you just let it go.

    If that makes any sense... :D
     

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