Corona virus vs religious tradition..

wil

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Communion, holy water, handshakes, hugs, gathering for prayer....

Old religious logic would say your faith will protect you.

I wanna know the changes made by your religious institution as this progresses... And how attendance and the donation plate is affected.
 

RJM

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This morning at Mass: no holy water until health alert over. The basin is empty and covered. No hanshakes or hugs. Parishoners are given a squeeze of antiseptic hand cream on entering the church. Communion taken in the hand, not on the tongue. Wafer only, not wine, until further notice.
 

RJM

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COV>prayers?
No I don't think so. Imo. Just practical.

The Catholic Church has never really been a huggy church. After the Lord's Prayer there is normally a bit of 'peace be with you' handshaking.

Priests are allowed to omit the handshaking anyway. Its optional. Some old style priests omit it when they say Mass.

The prayers and ritual of the Mass are unchanged, except there is no communal wine chalice passed around and the communal handshake omitted. Lots of people don't take the wine anyway.

There are old style Catholics who like to kneel and take the communion wafer directly onto their tongue, but nowadays most people take it in their hands. So that's out for now.

Oh yes, there's no collection plate passed around. People can drop money into it on the way out.

The Bishop of Plymouth has issued a document to churches in his area outlining the health measures. So I don't know what happens elsewhere.
 
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wil

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L="RJM Corbet, post: 335225, member: 19373"]No I don't think so. Imo. Just practical.[/QUOTE]

But is it not an indication that tradition can change, communion ain't actually a requirement, and faith alone isn't a thing?
 

RJM

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But is it not an indication that tradition can change, communion ain't actually a requirement, and faith alone isn't a thing?
Well the essence of Catholic communion is the wafer, the wine is secondary and many people don't take the wine anyway. So it has not come to stopping communion, which is the essence of the Mass.

We'll have to see if things get more serious whether some priests will want to go on saying Mass, and whether or not some parishioners will go on attending.

It's not happening yet.

The Catholic Mass has survived considerably worse things?
 
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RJM

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Interesting...Judas got the bread but didn't get the wine....
He got the bit of bread dipped in wine? Christ dipped the sop of bread in the wine and gave it to Judas?

"Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when he had dipped the sop, he gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon."

John 13:26
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+13:26&version=KJV

I don't usually take the wine. But some people wait for the chalice and then dip the wafer in the wine.
 
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RJM

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Thought sop was a horseradish gravy in a dish...not wine. The wine the others drank after Judas left.
Oh. You could be right.
 
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Thomas

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Symbolically, Judas missing the wine is significant.

Difficult to say what the meal was like. Typically, and as around Passover (although the mass slaughter of lambs had not happened yet), they would have eaten bean stew, lamb, olives, bitter herbs, a fish sauce, unleavened bread, dates and aromatised wine.

There's been a popular view as studies of the Jewish character of the early church increase, that the Last Supper be seen as a Jewish Seder. Scholars regard this as anachronistic. Although it was a meal at Passover, it would have followed Second Temple Period custom. The earliest elements in the current Passover Seder are not mentioned until the ninth century.

Some Jesus Seminar scholars apparently believed the Lord's supper to have derived not from any actual event but rather was a gentile memorial practice. Bart Ehrman likewise questions the institution of the Eucharist do not appear in certain ancient manuscripts and might not have been originally in the text, however the earliest source, P75, dating from the 2nd century, does include it.
 

RabbiO

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There's been a popular view as studies of the Jewish character of the early church increase, that the Last Supper be seen as a Jewish Seder. Scholars regard this as anachronistic. Although it was a meal at Passover, it would have followed Second Temple Period custom. The earliest elements in the current Passover Seder are not mentioned until the ninth century.
Although a seder as we know it did not exist at the time of Jesus, the Talmud (B.Tr. Pesachim) makes clear that the elements of a seder were in place and practiced hundreds of years before the 9th century.
 

StevePame

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Dioceses in Illinois are going mass-less for at least a week.
 

Aupmanyav

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Does not affect us here in India. We had a boisterous Holi in Krishna's land and will have a boisterous temporary installation of Rama family idols in April at his supposed birth place where a mosque once stood. The Supreme Court decided in favor of Hindus. Muslims have been given a much bigger alternate place for the mosque. Did not please them much, but that is what it is.
 
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